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“We're Located in Ninilchik, the center of Kenai Peninsula fishing spots. Halfway from the Kenai River to Homer”

We are located on the Kenai Peninsula, at Mi 135.1 of the Sterling Highway in the heart of the Ninilchik Village and several State Recreation areas, a stone-throw from the world famous Ninilchik River on Mission Ave.
Our address is 66710 Mission Avenue, Ninilchik Village AK

Click map for
enlargement

Your windows and deck views look over the historic early Russian settlement of the Ninilchik Village located on the beautiful and highly productive Ninilchik River. Across the sea that unfolds before you are five massive active volcanoes which make up a portion of the “Ring of Fire” belt. Mt. Douglas to the South, then Mt. Augustine followed by Mts. Illiamna, Redoubt, and Spur going North. Watch them vent or periodically erupt spewing rock, ash and lightning from both the Volcanoes View and Village View suites. Bring your cameras and binoculars! These landforms are indescribable. Watch massive schools of fish (up to 20 miles long and 5 miles wide) pass by giant clam beds just off-shore, chased by whales, sea lions and seal herds day after day while observing salmon jumping and running rapids to escape the talons of bald and golden eagles in the river that wraps around you or witness sea otters and walrus working the clam beds. It is here and within view of every window.

Walk through the living Historic Russian Village of Ninilchik built by post Vitus Bearing’s planners after Bearing’s great discovery of Alaska. Attend or tour the Historic Russian Orthodox Church on the hill behind your suite. Everywhere you turn is flora and fauna in stunning quantities. During all commercial fish openers, fleets of fishing boats unload their bounty onto large fish tenders anchored in the sea just offshore in front of your suite or walk/drive to the Ninilchik Boat Harbor and watch fishermen unloading their catches of salmon, halibut and numerous other bottom fish at dock facilities. Grab your shovel and bucket and walk to the enormous clam beds and catch giant razor clams for dinner or take them back home with you. Watch or hunt brown bear, black bear, moose, caribou, wolves, mountain sheep, mountain goat, elk, and numerous other species of wildlife which abound here or go birding (numerous species of sea and terrestrial birds within your reach). While hiking or driving up the numerous rivers and streams in the area observe all salmon species in full spawning colors protecting their nests from predator fish species such as Dolly Varden and Rainbow Trout. Watch the male salmon fight for the mating rights of the females. Observe the beautiful dedication of the mating pairs maintaining their nests. Watch various bird, Brown Bear and other animal species feed on the fish carcasses that line the river’s edge as their life cycle comes to its conclusion and new life emerges.

While in Ninilchik, you will find that Homer, Anchor Point, Seldovia, Halibut Cove, Kenai, Soldotna and other communities are just minutes away by land, air or water as Ninilchik is strategically located in the center of the Southern Kenai Peninsula.
Welcome to Historic Ninilchik Village! Enjoy your stay.

Alaska Adventure Suites – Property/Location History

Through our archeological dig and reconstruction of the lodge we have created ‘Histories Mysteries’ display in each suite. Researching the history of this parcel is on-going. So far we have determined that originally this site was inhabited by Alaska Natives. In the modern era, this parcel was owned by David & Wanda Cooper. The house was first used by Mike and Zoya Oskolkof and family. That house is gone. The current lodge was built in 1997 and completely renovated in summer/fall 2004.

Ninilchik History (1846)

Ninilchik was established as a principal Russian establishment in south-central Alaska and the language spoken was Russian. Most people living in Ninilchik at that time had some Native Alaskan blood. The Russian language was spoken widely in Ninilchik among members of the old families as late as the mid-1950s and it is still understood and occasionally spoken by a few older people in Ninilchik today. In the 1930s, homesteading on the Kenai Peninsula brought Americans to the “New Land” and numerous people to the Ninilchik area who spoke only the English language. The Russian language could not compete with the widely spoken English language with English finally prevailing. However, many of the old families continued speaking Russian in private and ‘saved’ some of the important words and phrases which are still pronounced in Russian today as an old dialect.

Name ‘Ninilchik’
Wayne Leman, a Ninilchik Old-Timer, gives the following interpretation of the ‘Ninilchik’ name origin. Originally, Ninilchik was named Munina after Mr. Munin (Moonin), one of the first Russian men to attempt living in Ninilchik. Peter Kalifornsky of Kenai remembers the name Munina which his people called Ninilchik. However, census records for Ninilchik from 1900 already listed two names for this place - Munina and Ninilchik. The name Ninilchik probably came from Niqnilchint, a Deniana Athabaskan word meaning ”lodge is built place”. It was a place where they would do subsistence hunting and fishing due the vast species numbers and diversity in this area. It is assumed from this meaning of the Indian name that people built a lodge along the Ninilchik River for staying while they fished, hunted, trapped and collected shell fish. After the Russians settled along the river, they must have adopted the original Athabaskan name and pronounced it more like an Aleut (or Eskimo), ending like many of the other Aleut or Eskimo names of places in Southwestern Alaska, such as Chignik, Nanwalek (English Bay), Naknek, etc. compromises of names in transitional areas.

Important Ninilchik Village Landmarks

1. Russian Orthodox Church on the hill and visible from the highway. The Church is located on top of the hill behind the lodge and is clearly visible from the suites. The Historical Church Path runs along the East side of this property and has been used since the beginning of the Christian Russian settlement era.

2. The old Leman house is located across the street. It is a year round private residence.

3. The old post office. Alyce Anderson’s house, later owned by Harry and Betty Leman, and used as a post office, and later as a hardware store. The house is across the street from Alaska Adventure Suites on the Ninilchik River. It is a seasonal private residence.


Post Office

The old Leman House

 

4. The Village Cache is a neighbor to Alaska Adventure Suites on the East side and across the famous Church Path. It was the Churkin house, later to become the Ninilchik Cash Store owned and operated by Sam and Irene Kraskof. It is currently a gift store which sells traditional Russian and Alaskana gifts and the finest fish fly hook in the world made from polar bear hair (believe it or not!) by native fishermen. It is owned and operated by Laura Trunell.

Numerous other historic buildings and landmarks are found throughout the village and are here for your exploration within a short walk.

  • Ninilchik River
  • Russian Heritage
  • Deep Creek
  • Volcanoes
  • Oyster Farming

 

66710 Mission Ave. , Ninilchik Village, AK
Mail address: P.O.Box 233502 Anchorage AK 99523

  Reservations: 907-277-1800


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